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Anonymous asked: Re: your "rule about naked people" -- How about people who take nude photos of themselves not be stupid and use storage devices that can be hacked, like cloud storage (or take any risks close to that)? Just HOW much personal responsibility does your generation need to shed before you get it through your thick skulls that it only costs $20 for a decent external hard drive these days? :|

fishingboatproceeds:

"The lock on your diary wasn’t very good, so it’s your fault I read your diary."

c0mf0rt-z0ne:

Bo Burnham speaking the truth

c0mf0rt-z0ne:

Bo Burnham speaking the truth


Daily Show correspondent Michael Che tries to find a safe place to report from.

(Source: sandandglass)


bertmacklinn-fbi:

empty-venus:

Breaking news: White fuckboys on twitter bitching how funny it is that Beyoncé is a feminist when she and her dancers were provocative and half naked. Despite feminism being about empowerment and a woman’s right to do whatever the hell she pleases with it, they just don’t seem to be able to grasp this concept.

In other news, men still don’t know what feminism is, still bitter that they aren’t Beyoncé and still making themselves look like asses on the internet.

And now the weather.

Wow, empty-venus this has almost 30,000 notes! 


arabellesicardi:

Here is a side by side comparison of how The New York Times has profiled Michael Brown — an 18 year old black boy gunned down by police — and how they profiled Ted Bundy, one of the most prolific serial killers of all time. 

Source for Brown, Source for Bundy.

Character assassination much. 

Speaker Review: Jackson Katz

creepercollection:

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Back in September, I had the privilege of seeing Jackson Katz speak at one of the colleges in my consortium. The author of both The Macho Paradox: Why Some Men Hurt Women and How All Men Can Help and Leading Men: Presidential Campaigns and the Politics of Manhood, Katz is a leading voice in the war against sexism and gender based violence.

You may also be familiar with him due to his recent Ted talk, “Violence Against Women- It’s a Men’s Issue”:

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 or his 2000 documentary “Tough Guise”:

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I was incredibly excited to hear him speak and he certainly did not disappoint.

Katz’s talk was so edifying. He started by explaining that the current way most people view feminism and violence against women is as “women’s issues that good men help out with” compared to “men’s issues”. Katz said that men “hear humans rights or social justice and think, it’s not a men’s issue” This is something I have absolutely experienced first hand. Working with both young women and young men, I see the differences in services offered. There are countless services aimed at protecting and educating young girls about the dangers of abusive relationships, yet nearly none aimed at educating men about how not to be abusers. Statistically speaking, we know women are dramatically more often on the receiving end of abuse. According to the U.S. Department of Justice, 95 percent of the victims of domestic violence are women.

When I helped to put on a Young Women’s Empowerment conference in December, we easily found multiple women to present on healthy relationships. Yet when it came time for the men’s conference months later, we had trouble finding one male speaker to talk about healthy relationships. Most men and male lead agencies were baffled by our request. Why were only women stepping up? Jackson Katz answered this question by explaining the way we as society talk about these issues. He noted that we often talk about women as survivors, but never men as perpetrators. You often see statistics saying how many women experience abuse or rape, but rarely see statistics saying how many men commit abuse or rape.

Additionally, he talked about the changing language used to talk about sexual assault. He charted the change from calling a woman in a sexual assault case a victim to an alleged victim to now often, an accuser. Calling these women an “accuser”, Katz noted, makes it so now the man is the victim, being that he is the victim of her accusation of sexual violence. Katz said this is all a part of a major problem of shifting the focus off of men. He said that it is often easier to blame victims than hold perpetrators accountable.

He also noted that men’s defensiveness about these issues shuts down critical thinking, forcing women to retreat. Impressively though, Katz noted that it was unfair of him to tell women what to do, due to his male privilege and how that would only be replicating our sexist power structure. Rather than telling women to do more, Katz puts it on himself and uses his privilege to talk to men as a way of directly tackling this problem.

He’s spoken to largely male groups including the NFL, NBA, and the Marines, and it hasn’t always turned out well for him. He jokingly told the audience how his work to end sexism has earned him the nickname “Dr. Katz-strated” by many angry misogynists. Additionally, Katz noted that when men defensively bring up the rates of violence against men as a way to shut down conversations about violence against women, they are forgetting that statistically almost always the people attacking men are other men. And Katz said for the same reason men attack men. It’s all about masculinity. Much of Katz’s work looks into deconstructing hegemonic masculinity, and the way popular masculinity profoundly damages both genders.

I would highly suggest reading or watching his works listed earlier if you’d like to learn more about this specifically. In the talk I attended though, he focused less on masculinity, but did mention how porn and peer culture shape social norms, and drive popular masculinity. He also said that we really need to raise the bar a little higher for what it takes to be a “good guy” in today’s society, which I certainly agreed with. I have so many times heard girls say how “impressive” or “attractive” it is when guys know what consent it or are against rape. That shouldn’t be impressive, it should be the bare minimum for being a human being!

Part of what drives Katz to do this work he said, is the importance and necessity he feels reaching out to men, as a man, is to ending violence against women. He urged moving away from just teaching “risk reduction” for women and instead focusing on truly preventing this violence and inequality, which means getting to the root of the problem.

Katz also made an interesting point saying that you can see in certain examples how society hasn’t come as far with sexism as it has with other issues, like racism. I do think talking about such things can be tricky, because racism is still a huge issue, but I thought Katz made a good point saying that Eminem would not be allowed to be racist. If he said the n-word, his career would be over. However, people make excuses constantly for his blatant misogyny, even when he talks about wanting to murder his ex-wife.

It was fascinating food for thought. Katz ended his talk saying “it’s not that we need to talk to our daughters about Miley Cyrus, we need to talk to our sons about Robin Thicke”, which was truly fitting given how close his talk was to their infamous VMA performance.

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I can’t stress enough how much I encourage men (and women) to check out Jackson Katz and the work he does. The world needs more men like him, using their privilege to end violence against women. Because it’s not just a female issue, it’s a male issue too and men need to be held accountable.

~j 

And how hard is it to land even a minimum-wage job? This year, the Ivy League college admissions acceptance rate was 8.9%. Last year, when Walmart opened its first store in Washington, D.C., there were more than 23,000 applications for 600 jobs, which resulted in an acceptance rate of 2.6%, making the big box store about twice as selective as Harvard and five times as choosy as Cornell. Telling unemployed people to get off their couches (or out of the cars they live in or the shelters where they sleep) and get a job makes as much sense as telling them to go study at Harvard.


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"Why Don’t the Unemployed Get Off Their Couches?" and Eight Other Critical Questions for Americans

(via seriouslyamerica)



I was walking around alone in a new shirt and the bottom half of my costume- no wig or corset- when a much older dude walked up to me and asked to take a picture. I laughed and started to explain that this wasn’t actually a costume, that as a human being, I got sweaty and rashy wearing a corset for the last 8 hours and changed into something more comfortable, but he took that as a “yes” and pulled out his phone. He put his arm around my waist and whispered “I only come here for the pictures of the girls,” to me as he snapped a selfie of us. Then he grabbed a handful of my butt and walked away. I’m gonna fucking murder myself!


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Helena

(via creepercollection)




Jennifer. College. Straight Edge. Generation Hopeful. Southern California.